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Remington 1100 shockwave

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2018 1:34 pm
Looks like Black Aces Tactical is going big on their Shockwave semi auto variant.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8d0Bd0jqFjs
When people ignorant of guns make gun laws, you end up with ignorant gun laws.
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.410
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 3:39 am
Short recoil spring? Seems to work ok though. The short barrel not causing fails either, there’s maybe fixes in there for regular 1100/1187s?
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 8:14 am
I only own 2 semi's and both of them are Turkish imports.

A Charles Daly Field Maxi-mag and an Emporer Arms MX5.

The Charles Daly came with a 3-1/2" bore and wouldn't cycle weak low brass shells due to the strength of the action spring, recoil spring, whatever you want to call it due to being set up for strong goose loads.

But since I don't use anything over 2-3/4" shells, and even more rarely a 3", I shortened the spring a little at a time until it would just barely eject a low brass shell and so it wouldn't batter itself to death with a 3". I also bought a new replacement from Numrich for the gun just in case I ever needed it. Especially since they've not been imported for so long and no intention to import more.

The MX5 shot the low brass straight out of the box and ate it like candy. Will spit them out as fast as you can pull the trigger. And if anything, ejects 3" magnums into the next zip code. I think the 3" shells are a little hard on it actually. I thought about trying the heavier CD spring in that gun since they appear to be similar in diameter to see if I can tune it to be reliable in both lengths without compromising the gun to make it a little softer shooting with the heavys but has been on the back burner.

Semi auto shotguns can be a little tempermental. But there are so many different shells and powders and payloads, and length combinations being used, it's no wonder.
When people ignorant of guns make gun laws, you end up with ignorant gun laws.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 9:26 am
Since when do regular 1100s/11-87s need a fix?
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.410
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:25 pm
Virginian wrote:Since when do regular 1100s/11-87s need a fix?

A fair point Sir!
My comments were simply regarding the short spring and close proximity to the muzzle of the gas vents. The people behind the 'Shockwave' have obviously addressed the problems that these features would seem to present.
I now have all the right parts for my 1187 and hope to report on its reliability after the weekend, so continuing my confidence in the Remington product
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 12:56 pm
Shortening the barrel in the case of the shockwave, reduces the dwell time that the gas pressure has to work.

What often has to be done on gas operated short barrel rifles at least is the gas ports need to be enlarged to allow more gas to enter the gas system.

I don't know that anyone has to enlarge the gas port on the short semi shotguns or not, but if they short stroke, that's the second thing I would change with the spring being the first since it's cheaper, easier, and not a permanent alteration. You can't ever undrill a hole. But you can change a spring back to the one you started with.
When people ignorant of guns make gun laws, you end up with ignorant gun laws.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 1:11 pm
I would think it would be a relatively easy matter to modify a standard 1100 or 11-87 to function with the short barrel and lack of an action spring tube, the problems arise when people want to modify a gun and still have it do everything it was originally intended for, or to be able to function with anything other than a very short list of ammunition.
Some (at least) Remington 1100s exported to the United Kingdom had an hourglass tapered bronze screw installed at right angles to the gas ports, which were enlarged, to allow adjustable gas ports. A great idea that Americans with our liability laws could not be entrusted with. Many people have enlarged the gas ports to allow operation with shortened barrels.
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PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2018 2:37 pm
Virginian wrote: the problems arise when people want to modify a gun and still have it do everything it was originally intended for, or to be able to function with anything other than a very short list of ammunition.

Quite so, and I plead probably guilty as charged! I am sure you see this over and over, particularly with the venerable 1100 and 1187 where we take a perfectly sound game or clay sporting shotgun and turn it into a high capacity, speed loading, fast shooting, light loaded, high performance tool. Amazingly perhaps, the old school Remington design still performs exceptionally well even with the advent of the Beretta's and Benelli's on the scene(and I've seen a fair amount of fails with those guns too)
The old saying "If it ain't broke don't fix it" probably applies here but fortunately (for me I suppose) my old 1187 was free, somewhat neglected and a bit broken with some parts missing, so getting it working will, I am sure, produce a great, low cost, competition gun.
Interesting, your comment about UK guns and variable gas ports, I shall have to look out for those

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