• Advertisement

Remington 1100 Autoloader Troubleshooting

Moderators: MikeD, TuJays

User avatar
Moderator
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:08 pm
PostPosted: Fri Nov 30, 2012 9:13 am
The feed latch needs to be held in place for you gun to function properly. Normally it is staked in (this is the dents you see)
As stated you will have to tap it back in flush, brownells sells a staking tool that will allow you to restake it, but I have had excellent results using super glue.

Make certain the both gas ports are open by pushing a piece of .030 - .060 mig welding wire thru both, keep in mind that the holes angle backwards, but you need to visibly see the wire protrude into the barrel. I think a 1/16" (.0625) drill bit will also pass thru and clean out any crude buildup in each hole. I will check my notes when I get home to let you know the exact diameter of the holes, but two open holes should allow it enough gas to function all day long.

Next, lets talk ammo! What are you using?
If the heads are steel instead of brass and your chamber is or has been rough, pitted, rusted, ect... Then when the shell is fired this steel head will expand into these minuet imperfections, this extra friction can cause the issues you describe.
Polishing your chamber with some steel wool wrapped around a cleaning brush chucked up in a cordless drill will clean it right up. Run it in and out until the outside of the barrel feels hot:)
We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!
User avatar
Copper BB
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: Illinois
PostPosted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:31 pm
I have an 1100 made in the '70s (?) and I wanted to know the date of manufacture. Any correlation to the serial number? If so, where can I find this info? I've seen info for barrels, but because they are interchangable the date need not be the shotgun's date.

Thanks.
In the words of The Beatles,
"When I hold you in my arms, and I feel my finger on your trigger.
I know nobody can do me no harm, because happiness is a warm gun, Momma.
Happiness is a warm gun, yes it is."
User avatar
Moderator
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:08 pm
PostPosted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 8:57 am
Call Remington and give them the serial number, they will tell you when it was born, however keep in mind they do make errors.

Back up what they tell you with this information;
DECODING REMINGTON SERIAL NUMBERS
Model 870 LETTER PREFIX
1950 TO APPROX 1968: NO SERIAL NUMBER PREFIX
1968 TO PRESENT: LETTERS USED (IN SEQUENCE)
S-68, T-74, V-78, W-84, X-90, A-91, B-94, C-97, D-01, AB-05

Model 870 LETTER SUFFIX (DESIGNATES GAUGE)
V 12 GA. (2 3/4”)
M 12 GA. MAGNUM (3”)
A 12 GA. “SUPER” MAGNUM (3 ½”)
W 16 GA. ( 2 ¾” )
X 20 GA. “HEAVY FRAME” (DISCONTINUED)
N 20 GA. “HEAVY FRAME MAGNUM” (DISCONTINUED)
K 20 GA. “LIGHT WEIGHT” (“LW”) (ALSO INCLUDES M/1100 “LT”)
U 20 GA. LW MAGNUM (ALSO INCLUDES M/1100 “LT”)
J 28 GA.
H .410 BORE (2 ½” OR 3”)

Model 1100 LETTER PREFIX
1963 TO APPROX. 1968: NO SERIAL NUMBER PREFIX
1968 TO PRESENT: LETTERS USED (IN SEQUENCE)
L-68, M-74, N-78, P-85, R-90


Model 1100 LETTER SUFFIX
SAME STRUCTURE AS THE Model 870 listed above

Model 1187 LETTER PREFIX
1987 TO PRESENT: “PC” 12 GA., 1999 “TL“ 20 GA.,
2000 “SM” SUPER MAG.

LETTER SUFFIX
NO LETTER SUFFIX ON THIS MODEL

Then look on the left side of the barrel near the receiver and look for a two letter date code stamp and follow this chart with the first letter being the month and the second being the year the barrel was made;
Month
B - Jan L - Feb A - Mar C - Apr K - May P - Jun
O - Jul W - Aug D - Sep E - Oct R - Nov X - Dec

Year
M - 1921 N - 1922 P - 1923 R - 1924 S - 1925
T - 1926 U - 1927 W - 1928 X - 1929 Y - 1930
Z - 1931 A - 1932 B - 1933 C - 1934 D - 1935
E - 1936 F - 1937 G - 1938 H - 1939 J - 1940
K - 1941 L - 1942 MM - 1943 NN - 1944 PP - 1945
RR - 1946 SS - 1947 TT - 1948 UU - 1949 WW - 1950
XX - 1951 YY - 1952 ZZ - 1953 A - 1954 B - 1955
C - 1956 D - 1957 E - 1958 F - 1959 G - 1960
H - 1961 J - 1962 K - 1963 L - 1964 M - 1965
N - 1966 P - 1967 R - 1968 S - 1969 T - 1970
U - 1971 W - 1972 X - 1973 Y - 1974 Z - 1975
I - 1976 O - 1977 Q - 1978 V - 1979 A - 1980
B - 1981 C - 1982 D - 1983 E - 1984 F - 1985
G - 1986 H - 1987 I - 1988 J - 1989 K - 1990
L - 1991 M - 1992 N - 1993 O - 1994 P - 1995
Q - 1996 R - 1997 S - 1998 T - 1999 (*) U - 2000 (*)
V - 2001 (*) W - 2002 X - 2003 Y - 2004 Z - 2005
A - 2006 B - 2007 C - 2008 D - 2009 E - 2010
F - 2011 G - 2012 H - 2013
We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!
User avatar
Copper BB
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 6:25 pm
Location: Illinois
PostPosted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 4:39 am
I called today and my 1100 serial number M******V was a 12 gauge 2 3/4 made in 1975, which is what I expected.

Thanks.
In the words of The Beatles,
"When I hold you in my arms, and I feel my finger on your trigger.
I know nobody can do me no harm, because happiness is a warm gun, Momma.
Happiness is a warm gun, yes it is."

Copper BB
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:13 pm
PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:33 pm
I am new to this forum and I am having problems with my auto loading remington 1100 12g. the problem I am having is I can fire the gun and it will extract the the spent round but will not load the second round it gets cot by the carrier plate because the does not hang low enough. have any of you experienced this issue and or know how to fix this issue.
User avatar
Moderator
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:08 pm
PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:15 pm
What shells are you shooting?

And

Please describe the "hangs low enough" part in more detail as I am not sure what you are saying.
Pictures would help:)
We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!

Copper BB
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:13 pm
PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 11:48 pm
Well the shells i have right now are federal target load 2 3/4, not sure off hand of the other types I have used but none of the types i have used have made a differents.
(The carrier stops the shell from loading) The carrier hangs up and jams the shell so the shell wont load. Sorry if I am not making sense I don't really know how to explain what is going on.
User avatar
Moderator
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:08 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 8:21 am
How old is the gun?
Have you ever completely cleaned it?
How much has it been fired?

I still am not certain about your description, but a good detailed cleaning would be the first thing I would advise. This includes completely striping the gun down, cleaning, and lubricating everything. This is also a good time to check for worn, damaged, loose parts...debris etc.
Clean the gas ports located in the barrel ring.
Clean the inside of the magazine tube, spring and follower.
remove the bolt, trigger mechanism and clean and lube all parts.
Make sure the O ring is not broken or badly damaged and that the two seals are installed correctly.
Lightly oil the outside of the mag tube and action sleeve, 1100's do not like to be dry.

Unless it is a mechanical failure, most all 1100 issues can be corrected with a good timely cleaning. They are awesome firearms that will go and go and go, but eventually they need to be cleaned in ways other than just wiping them down to keep everything in time. If you have never done this then I suggest finding a local gun smith that can help you.
We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!

Copper BB
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:13 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 9:04 pm
I have cleaned the gun a few times and none of the times have fixed the issue tho I have not cleaned the trigger assembly. Here are a few pictures to maybe help illustrate the issue I am running in to.
http://s1272.photobucket.com/user/coder ... ry/?page=1
User avatar
Moderator
Posts: 169
Joined: Sat Oct 27, 2012 10:08 pm
PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:18 pm
its dirty.....pull the bolt handle out, remove the bolt, knock out the two trigger pins and remove the whole trigger group.......clean it all inside and out, lightly oil and reassemble, and you should be good to go.
We have done so much for so long with so little, we are now qualified to do anything with nothing!
PreviousNext

Return to Remington Model 1100

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

  • Advertisement